Is Monday, 3 January 2011 a bank/public holiday?

UPDATE 6 March 2012: Is Monday 19 March 2012 (the Monday after St Patrick’s Day, 17 March, which falls on a Saturday in 2012) a bank/public holiday?

Where a public holiday falls on a weekend, employees do not have any automatic legal entitlement to have the next working day ie Monday off work… You are still entitled to time/money in lieu for the public holiday.”

Retail staff in Ireland will probably find themselves working this St Patrick’s Day as it is the day before Mother’s Day and Saturday is an important retail day anyway. Our advice is to go directly to the Citizen’s Information page to find out what your entitlements are as an employee or obligations as an employer.

They say: Employees who qualify will be entitled to one of the following:

  • A paid day off on the public holiday
  • An additional day of annual leave
  • An additional day’s pay
  • A paid day off within a month of the public holiday

UPDATE 21 DECEMBER 2012: Wondering whether Tuesday, 27 December 2011 or Monday, 2 January 2012 are days off work? In Ireland, as you can read below:

Where a public holiday falls on a weekend, employees do not have any automatic legal entitlement to have the next working day ie Monday off work… You are still entitled to time/money in lieu for the public holiday.”

BUT. Although there’s no automatic legal entitlement, most non-retail, non-manufacturing, businesses and organisations are more than likely going to keep those doors firmly shut.

 

Original article:

As small business owners around Ireland are fixing their Christmas leave, one date in particular is confusing them. Is Monday, 3 January 2011 a bank holiday or a public holiday? In other words, ‘when do we tell our clients we’re reopening after Christmas?’, or ‘what date do we tell staff they’re to return to work?’

Aztec Calendar at the Anthropology Museum in Mexico City

Figuring out the Christmas and New Years public holidays can be as difficult as figuring out a calendar from an ancient civilisation. (Photo: Michael McCarthy)

Technically speaking, employers and managers should have the same query about Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 December, 2010. ‘Why?’ you may wonder.

Where a public holiday falls on a weekend, employees do not have any automatic legal entitlement to have the next working day ie Monday off work.

The public holidays in question are Christmas Day and St Stephen’s Day (Saturday, 25 and Sunday, 26 December 2010) and of course New Year’s Day (Saturday, 1 January 2011).

But before you as an employer get into a panic of shortening your own leave, please remember, that although there’s no automatic legal entitlement, most non-retail, non-manufacturing, businesses and organisations are more than likely going to keep those doors firmly shut until Tuesday, 4  January, 2011.

If you’re an employee and have a boss that thinks Saturday and Sunday is enough recovery time from New Year’s Eve, fear not. You are still entitled to time/money in lieu for the public holiday that is Saturday 1, January.

The very informative Citizens Information Board has loads of information on it. Go to this page and do a Ctrl+F for Saturday or scroll towards the bottom of the page.

Why am I going to the bother of putting all this together? I noticed people enquiring about it on various social media streams and many moons ago, I wrote workplace-related articles for an Irish Independent supplement called Jobs & Careers and wrote about the same topic back then. I get it. Do you get it? If you don’t the handiest thing to do is start the New Year with a four-day week. It’ll make the start back to work easier on everyone. If you don’t fancy that, remember you do have to give your staff pay or time in lieu for starting back to work on Monday 3, January.

So have you decided yet? What are you going to do? Open on the Monday or the Tuesday?

2 replies
  1. aisleen flanagan
    aisleen flanagan says:

    I work in retail so im just wondering because saturday is part of my 4 day working week am i entitled to monday as a bank holiday? Please can you give me an answer to this as soon as possible.

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